It’s too good to be true

Customers are suspicious when businesses promote something that seems too good to be true, because they’ve learned that it often is. makes me think of the Telus deal that lowered my bill and gave me more bandwidth. It took my about 5 minutes of questioning to believe that they would call me out of the […]

Trust matters more than truth

We’re in an era where trust matters more than truth, and the truth is that your customers simply don’t trust you as much as they trust each other.

Veiled Conflict

Teams that lack trust are incapable of engaging in unfiltered and passionate debate of ideas. Instead, they resort to veiled discussions and guarded comments.

The real leader

People would rather follow a leader who is always real versus a leader who is always right. Don’t try to be a perfect leader, just work on being an authentic one.

The enemy of accountability is ambiguity

The enemy of accountability is ambiguity, and even when a team has initially committed to a plan or a set of behavioral standards, it is important to keep those agreements in the open so that no one can easily ignore them.

Review key decisions

At the end of a staff meeting or off-site, a team should explicitly review the key decisions made during the meeting, and agree on what needs to be communicated to employees or other constituencies about those decisions. What often happens during this exercise is that members of the team learn that they are not all […]

Emotional Debate and Punishment

By building trust, a team makes conflict possible because team members do not hesitate to engage in passionate and sometimes emotional debate, knowing that they will not be punished for saying something that might otherwise be interpreted as destructive or critical. also a key to communication in marriage

Team openness

Team members who are not genuinely open with one another about their mistakes and weaknesses make it impossible to build a foundation for trust.

Hiring top performers

Companies hoping to recruit the best and the brightest must demonstrate that they trust their employees with the freedom to work anywhere. They must assume that they’re buying talent and dedication, not what the Brazilians call “butt-on-chair time.”

People are adults

People are considered adults in their private lives, at the bank, at their children’s schools, with family and among friends — so why are they suddenly treated like adolescents at work? Why can’t workers be involved in choosing their own leaders? Why can’t they speak up — challenge, question, share information openly?