Natural level of productivity

Everyone has a natural level of productivity. It will vary from person to person, but everyone has a limited amount of physical, mental, and creative energy. Every hour of work costs energy.

Ideas don’t matter

You can have the best ideas in the world—but if you haven’t shipped, you haven’t done anything.

Measuring time is easy

Measuring time is literally the easiest way to assess someone’s dedication and productivity, but it’s also very unreliable.

We don’t think about how to rest better

Many of us are interested in how to work better, but we don’t think very much about how to rest better. Productivity books offer life hacks, advice about what CEOs or famous writers do. But they say almost nothing about the role of rest in the lives or careers of creative productive people. When they […]

The amount of work you can do is constant

Rather than scrambling to meet an impossible deadline, work to your normal pace. The amount of work you can do is constant — the only real question is which work to do.

HelloSign and the Productivity Paradox

Interesting article about adding tools to improve productivity which result in, getting less done as the overhead to manage the new systems continues to pile up and pile up. Read the full article

When it’s all urgent it’s all equal

When everything feels urgent and important, everything seems equal. We become active and busy, but this doesn’t actually move us any closer to success. Activity is often unrelated to productivity, and business rarely takes care of business.

You Can’t Make Someone Productive

No manager can make an employee productive. Managers are catalysts. They can speed up the reaction between the talent of the employee and the needs of the customer and company. They can help the employee find his path of least resistance toward his goals.

You Must Say No

You can get control of your tasks and activities only to the degree that you stop doing some things and start spending more time on the few activities that can really make a difference in your life. From Eat That Frog by Brian Tracy

Eat that Frog by Brian Tracy

This book has 21 guidelines to help you “eat your frog” which is the big ugly task you probably want to avoid. They group into five generic categories though and have some overlap.